The Farmer's Daughter Chattanooga

The Farmer’s Daughter's farm-to-table cafe in North Chattanooga has permanently closed.  We are still in Chattanooga, moving on to smaller and better things.  The past two+ years has been amazingly successful and we are proud and honored to have shared them with all of you.  

The restaurant may be gone, but we will continue to be a part of the local food economy in Chattanooga.  We believe in supporting and cultivating a sustainable future for farmers, artists, small business-folk, and families.    

Stay in touch through social media and be sure to sign up for our newsletter. We look forward to what the future will bring.

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The Farmer’s Daughter's farm-to-table cafe in North Chattanooga has permanently closed.  We are still in Chattanooga, moving on to smaller and better things.  The past two+ years has been amazingly successful and we are proud and honored to have shared them with all of you.  The restaurant may be gone, but we will continue to be a part of the local food economy in Chattanooga.  We believe in supporting and cultivating a sustainable future for farmers, artists, small business-folk, and families.    Stay in touch through social media and be sure to sign up for our newsletter.


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ANN AND MIKE

The Farmer’s Daughter was owned and operated by Ann Keener and Mike Mayo.

Ann is The Farmer’s Daughter.  When she was a young lass, she and her family moved out to the Sequatchie Valley.  By the time Ann turned 13, Sequatchie Cove Farm was beginning to bloom and grow.  There she learned to milk a cow, pick beans, and developed a deep understanding and love for fresh seasonal food.  After leaving the farm, Ann attended Ballymaloe Cookery School’s certification course in Ireland, and traveled to Oaxaca, Mexico to hunt down the illusive mole sauces of the mountains.  

Mike Mayo hails from Nashville, Tennessee where he grew up with his father’s independently owned office furniture business.

Before opening the cafe, Ann and Mike had been holding “underground” dinners throughout the fair city of Chattanooga for the past 4 years.   These moving feasts have been hosted in homes, studios, and occasionally a coffee roaster’s and they always feature the best of the season, whether it be a soup of wild nettles from Alexzanna Farm,  or Sequatchie Cove Farm lamb ribs rubbed with Velo Coffee.  The dinners  have also always incorporated functional art made by local potters and glassblowers-  donated for use during the dinner, and available for purchase.  

Ann and Mike believe that the future economy depends on conscious consumerism and that the bowl you sip your soup from is just as important as the soup.  The Farmer’s Daughter was the resting place for these dinners, where Ann and Mike grew and shared their appreciation and love for the local economy of food.  

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